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Jack Zevin

Jack Zevin

Queens College of the City University of New York
(718) 997-5150 or 5163/64 (Office)
Department of Secondary Education
(718) 997-5152 (Fax)
Powdermaker Hall 150
65-30 Kissena Boulevard
Flushing, NY 11367
Email: jzevin@aol.com

Educational Background
B.A. University of Chicago, 1962
M.A.T. University of Chicago, 1964
Ph.D. University of Michigan, 1969

Certifications
Illinois Secondary School License
Michigan Secondary School License

Professional Experience
Date of Hire/CUNY: September 1, 1969
Professor of Secondary Education (1969-Present, Asst., 1969, Assoc., 1973, Full, 1979))
Academic Advisor and Admissions Officer for Social Studies Education (1969-present)
Supervisor of Social Studies Unit Program (1969-present)
Chairperson, Department of Secondary Education (1998-2001)
Director, Resource and Training Project for Economic Education/QC (1974-present) Affiliated with the National and New York State Councils on Economic Education
Co-Director, Taft Institute for Government @ Queens College (1996-present)
Acting Director, World Studies Program (1996-Present)
Panel Head, Ethnic and Area Studies Committee, PSC/CUNY Research Awards (1998-present)
Executive Committee, University Research Award Program, PSC/CUNY Awards (2000-present)

Selected Major Publications (refereed and reviewed)

Young Citizens of the World: Teaching and Learning Social Studies,
K-8. (co-authored with Lynne Boyle-Baise, Indiana University)
(Projected for completion in 2008), Mahwah, N.J., L. J. Erlbaum/Associates/ Routledge.
Teaching on a Tightrope: Thinking About the Foundations of Instruction (a work in progress, completion in 2009)
‚“The New Social Studies Revisited: Central Concepts of Inquiry in Massialas & Cox, Pedersen, J. & Totten, S., Eds. (2008)

‚“Mental Maps of Neophyte Teachers‚: A research study of the mental maps of student teachers and new teachers (with Dr. Jeffrey Cabat, Lehman College) for submission to Theory and Research In Social Education (Spring, 2008)
Teaching World History as Mystery (with David Gerwin): contract forthcoming with L J Erlbaum Associates/Routledge (Fall, 2008)
Social Studies for the 21st Century, 3rd Edition (forthcoming, Spring, 2007)
LJ Erlbaum Associates, Publisher
The Social Studies, ‚“How We See Others: Cross-national Student Perspectives on each others countries‚, 234-254, Spring, 2004.
Teaching American History As Mystery, (Spring, 2003), with David Gerwin, Heinemann & Co., Publisher.
Social Studies for the 21st Century, Second Edition (2000), Mahwah, NJ: L. J. Erlbaum Associates, Publisher.
Social Studies for the 21st Century, First Edition (1995), White Plains, NY: Longman, Publisher.
‚“Teaching Anthropology and Social Science in the Social Studies‚ co-authored with Roger Owen inSocial Sciences Methods for the Social Studies (1994), Boston: Wadsworth, Publisher.
‚“The Place of the Social Sciences in the Social Studies,‚ The Social Studies (Sept/Oct, 1982) (A Special Issue).
Teaching Creatively, (co-authored with Byron Massialas )(1983), Malabar, FL: Kreiger & Sons Publisher.
Teaching World History Through Inquiry (1971-1975): A Multimedia Modular System of Units with visual/audio/cartographic supplements‚, (with Byron Massialas) Rand McNally & Co
Creative Encounters in the Classroom (1967), co-authored with Byron Massialas, New York: John Wiley & Sons Publisher.

Grants and Contracts ( Recent Awards and Grants
U. S. Office of Education, Teaching American History, Pride and progress, A project for Region 4 K-8 Teachers, in collaboration with the Brooklyn Museum, and the QC Elementary Education Department. (2006-2009) $954,000
National Council for Economic Education, ‚“Making a Job‚ a program of economic education and professional development for social studies teachers (Summer, 2006-Fall, 2007) $14,585
U.S. Office of Education, Improving the Teaching of American History, a joint project with Regions 3 and 4 of New York City DOE (2005-2008)
Two joint grants of $982,000 each.
U.S. Office of Education, Faculty Development Programs, in conjunction with The Asia Society, ‚“infusing Asia into teacher preparation programs, 2005-2008,
U.S. Office of Education, Teaching American History Program: A Collaborative Project with Region 8, Brooklyn and the New York Historical Society (2003-06), $994,000
U.S. Office of Education, Teaching American History Program: A Collaborative Project with the Alternative Schools of New York and the New York Historical Society, (2001-2004).
PSC/CUNY Research Award, ‚“UK and US: Mutual Perceptions‚ (2000).
National Endowment for the Human/World History Association,
Infusing World History Views into Undergraduate Social Studies Methods Courses,
A Consortium Project, in collaboration with the University of Illinois, and California State University/Long Beach, (1999-2004).
‚“Training Pre-service Teachers to Adopt a Global View of History‚: A series of three institutes for in-service NYC 7-12 history teachers, (1997-2000). $75,000 per year for three years.

Narrative Highlights: Career, Interests, Presentations, and Achievements

My very active career has always been national in scope, beginning with a book published on the topic of creativity before becoming a professor, and continuing to the present with several books, most notably a long-term nationally adopted textbook used by hundreds of college faculty around the country in my specialty, social studies education, since 1992. Currently, I am working on a standard elementary methods textbook in my field, which will be offered to K-8 professors of education across North America.

I have been an active lifelong member of National Council for the Social Studies throughout my career, at which I have made well over one hundred presentations at local, national, and international meetings since 1969, and I am still active in its International, College and Secondary Divisions (CUFA). I have served on the College and University Faculty Association executive board, as well as on numerous NCSS committees over the years, and have been a delegate to the assembly a number of times.

My research career has focused mainly on studying the process of political socialization, how students and youth acquire their sense of identity in the political sphere, their attitudes toward politics, and the way in which change occurs with maturation and educational intervention. I have published on a wide range of topics including students‚¬â„¢ attitudes toward politics, curriculum inquiry, and instructional methodology. Much of my work has evolved from a long-standing interest in how students see their world, and their local communities.

Perhaps my most significant national achievements are, however, centered on social studies teaching methods and curriculum, experimenting with theories proposed by John Dewey, Jerome Bruner, and their counterparts who have advocated what are often termed ‚¬Ëœinquiry‚¬â„¢ or ‚¬Ëœdiscovery‚¬â„¢ approaches to social studies education. I have published a wide array of curriculum articles and materials, particularly in the fields of American and World History, and I have strongly advocated a global approach to teaching both world history and US history. I have most recently published, with Dr. David Gerwin of Queens College, a book ‚“Teaching American History as Mystery‚ (Heinemann, 2003) and we are soon to sign a sequel to this work aimed at developing the ‚¬Ëœmystery idea in global /world history. I have completed revising and updating a new edition of my nationally adopted methods book for the field entitled, ‚“Social Studies for the 21st Century.‚ (Erlbaum, 2007) which has been updated and republished since 1992.

In addition, I have authored or co-authored several other books on creative pedagogy, and curriculum, several dealing with conceptions of social studies, as well as a wide variety of articles and monographs on U.S. and World history and the social sciences. The most recent work conceptualizing instruction in an age of reform, tentatively entitled ‚“Teaching on a Tightrope‚ projected for 2009. Most recently, I have been asked to contribute to two different forthcoming publications that will take a fresh look at the social studies and history education movement of the 1960s and 1970s, generally referred to as the ‚¬Ëœnew‚¬â„¢ social studies led by key figures in education such as Jerome Bruner, Theodore Fenton, and Fred Newmann.

. As co-director of The Taft Institute for Government, a federally recognized non-profit foundation whose mission is the civic education of teachers and pupils, I have conducted a summer/fall institute for teachers and school administrators every year since 1995 in collaboration with Dr. Michael Krasner of Political Science (QC). Within its framework, I have completed research for the development of simulation games dealing with political topics such as voting rights, city council, and mock election games, along with research into teacher and student attitudes toward exercising their right to vote. We are nearing completion of a new simulation game entitled, ‚“Maxiopolis: A game of City Council‚ which we hope will be widely used by teachers in secondary civics and government classes. This program has enrolled well over six hundred participants reaching an estimated 26,000 students in the public, private, and parochial schools of Queens and Nassau Counties over the last decade.

My last area to mention is one in which I have been nationally recognized nearly every year of my Queens College career through the writing, submission, and awarding of grants. Approximately two or three grants, large and small have been awarded to me or to one of the programs I direct since my hiring in 1969. Grant awards have included multiple, multi-year awards from The National Science Foundation, The National Endowment for the Humanities, The U.S. Office of Education, The U.S. Institute for Peace, The National Council for Economic Education, as well as other smaller agencies and groups, including private and corporate awards, e.g., from the New York Community Trust, and the Rockefeller Brothers Fund.

 

Honors, Academic Awards & Editorial Positions

National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow,
American Historical Association Summer Project, Library of Congress, 2005
National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow, Ohio State University, 2003
Presidential Teaching Award, Queens College, 1997
Executive Committee, College and University Faculty Assembly,
National Council for the Social Studies, 1996-1999, 1999-2001
Contributing Editor, The Social Studies, 1980-Present
Contributing Editor, The Social Studies Record, 1992-1998

Lifelong Active Memberships

National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS)
College and University Association of Social Studies Professionals (CUFA)
World History Association (WHA)
American Historical Association (AHA)
American Organization of Historians (OAH)
New York State Council for Social Studies Education (NYSCSS)
ATSS/UFT: New York City Association of Teachers of Social Studies (ATSS)
National Council on Economic Education (NCEE)
New York State Council on Economic Education (NYSCEE)

Narrative Highlights: Career, Interests, Presentations, and Achievements

Jack has been an active lifelong member of NCSS throughout his career, at which he has made well over one hundred presentations since 1969 and is still active. He has previously served on the CUFA executive board, as well as on numerous NCSS committees over the years, and has been a delegate to the assembly. His research career has focused mainly on studying the process of political socialization, how students and youth acquire their sense of identity in the political sphere, their attitudes toward politics, and the way in which change occurs with maturation and educational intervention. He has published on a wide range of topics including students‚¬â„¢ attitudes toward politics, curriculum inquiry, and instructional methodology. Much of this work has evolved from a long-standing interest in how students see their world, and their local communities. Jack‚¬â„¢s most significant achievements are, however, centered on social studies teaching methods, particularly American and World History, and he has most recently co-authored, with Dr. David Gerwin of Queens College, a new book ‚“Teaching American History as Mystery‚ (Heinemann, 2003) and is currently revising and updating a new edition of his methods book for the field entitled, ‚“Social Studies for the 21st Century.‚ (Erlbaum, 2007) In addition, Jack has authored or co-authored several other books on creative pedagogy, several dealing with conceptions of social studies, as well as a wide variety of articles and monographs on U.S. and World history and the social sciences. The most recent work conceptualizing instruction in an age of reform, tentatively entitled ‚“Teaching on a Tightrope‚ projected for 2008 . As co-director of The Taft Institute for Government, with Dr. Michael Krasner of Political Science, Jack has pursued research and development on simulation games dealing with political topics such as voting rights, city council, and mock election games, along with research into teacher and student attitudes toward exercising their right to vote.

Significant University Assignments and Committees

University Faculty Senate, 2005-2008
University Research Award Committee Head for Ethnic and Area Studies, 1998-
University Research Award Executive Committee, 2004-
University Faculty Senate, Senator and Member, Research Committee, 2005-2008

Faculty Professional Development

Asia Society (funded by the US Office of Education, 2005-2008)
Purdue University, Economic Education Fellowship, 1978-80
Ohio State University, NEH Fellow, Institute on, ‚“Persecutions and Reformation in the Age of Elizabeth‚ (2002)
American Historical Association, NEH Fellow, Institute on ‚“America in a Global Age‚
Washington, D.C. (2004)
Asia Society, Fellow, U.S. Office of Education Institute on ‚“The Silk Road, Ancient to Modern‚ (2005-2008)

General Research History (last 10 years)

Research for the last ten years has focused on student perceptions of their own and other nations, with samples drawn from the U.S., Malaysia, Australia, United Kingdom, and Canada. A series of studies was conducted employing a semantic differential survey form in several communities and countries, resulting so far in three published studies, one in The Social Studies, a national journal. Partial support has come from three PSC/CUNY grants, which funded travel for data collection and data analysis. The most recent study in this series, still underway, has focused on the ‚¬Ëœmental maps‚¬â„¢ of the world drawn by student teachers in two teacher preparation programs. Additional curriculum research has focused on the integration of U.S. and World Studies into a comprehensive Global program for the secondary level, and this is still ongoing, partially supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities in conjunction with the World History Association.

In addition, I have served eight years as an executive committee member and chief liaison for the Ethnic and Area Studies Committee, that is part of the University Research Committee of CUNY (UCRA) in charge of PSC/CUNY awards.

College and Professional Roles (Last 15 years)

Graduate, and Undergraduate, Advisor in Social Studies Education.
Research Faculty Mentor in Graduate Social Studies.
Multicultural Young Adult Reading List, Committee Member
Global History: A Queens Superintendent‚¬â„¢s Project, 1995-2001.
Development of Multicultural Global Materials, Grades 7-12, Project Director, 1990-1997.

Book Announcements

creativeteaching

youngcitizen

"Making Democracy Work"